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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, there is a debt ceiling vote. now you hear a lot of republicans making noises about backing down from the debt ceiling fight. it is interesting by the way, i know we're not here to talk about that. it is interesting how the conventional wisdom has shifted on that. >> jennifer: quickly too. >> so quickly. just another sign of the shifting sands. it all hinges on how public opinion turns. and you know, is the president going to go out on the stump? is he going to go out and barnstorm the country for his proposals? how much political capital is he going to put into it? if he really builds up public support for the proposals and public support grows and if they feel pressure, he'll bring a vote. >> >> jennifer: just to take you back to that -- not the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling issue that the republicans do seem to be going soft on, i do think one of the reasons why they went so soft is because major traditionally republican lobbying groups were advocating like the chamber of commerce came out strongly saying this is crazy. i'm wondering if there are other traditionally republican groups like
the debt ceiling. it also removes the debate on section four of the 14th amendment. we will focus on all of this this sunday morning. it was a call. numbers at the bottom of your screen. we also want you to join us online on twitter and facebook or send us an e-mail. we will get your calls and comments in just a moment. our question, whether or not they residents can -- president can't bypass congress to raise the debt ceiling. she is preparing for his inaugural address. the president will seek a citizenship pass in a push as the debate over immigration continues here in washington and around the country. another headline getting a lot of attention is that the vice president continues his recommendations on how to deal with gun violence. tuesday he will give the president has outlined. p--- his outline. ,et's go to the hill newspaper which has one of a number of stories on this sunday morning related to the debt limit. senate democrats telling the president he may need to raise the debt limit on his own. a letter sent to the president on friday advising the white house to be prepared to
deficit reduction plan. understand that fitch is not just looking for an 11th hour debt ceiling deal that sets the table for another mini crisis down the road. the federal government hit the debt limit as you know on december 31st. the treasury is using so-called extraordinary measures to pay its bills through mid-february or early march. now, fitch predicts washington will extend the debt ceiling despite the current war of words between president obama and republicans in congress. what happens if we get downgraded? it happened before. remember 2011, when standard & poor's did it. that hit markets and the wider economy hard, but it didn't cause interest rates to increase. this time could be different, however, because the rest of the world is getting its act together. even successful businesses like ford are worried. here's what ceo alan mulally told me today. >> i think the most important thing to your point is that we come together around a solution that allows us to live within our means, to reduce our budget deficits, and also to deal with our trade deficits, and create an enviro
a vote that will delay the debt ceiling for three months. so what they are doing, if you really look at house republicans who took the majority two years ago, they did it standing on principle for pretty much every squirmish. it seems that they are becoming a bit more sophisticated, rather, but their understanding, it seems, is that you have to pick your battles. losing credit ratings and so forth, that's not a smart battle to wage. look at some of the most conservative members of the house talking to deirdre walsh at the end of their retreat for three days about picking their battles in a better way. >> deal with the smaller ones first, maybe build up a little momentum, credibility, not only with the credit markets but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of th
morgenson talks about mortgage lending. steve bell talks about the debt ceiling. then, the mission and scope of the bureau of all, tobacco, firearms, explosives. "washington journal," live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> next, "q&a." then, david -- david cameron takes questions at the house of commons. then a discussion on the guantanamo detention facility. >> the fundamental idea here is if you spend time in silicon valley, if you spend time in detroit, where the automobile industry is being rebuilt, if you spent time outside the beltway, you see that america has the potential to generate abundance for its own citizens and for the world. you spend time only inside the beltway, it looks like a zero sum game. it looks like a lose-lose. who will lose the most is the gist is the -- gist of the negotiation. water the lessons of the technology sector? what are the lessons that have come from the optimism in the technology sector? how can they give us some ideas that we can pass it a
the debt ceiling. this is the question we posed. is reduce the federal deficit a worthy goal? this is interesting you may recall white house press secretary made news by stating that deficit reduction is, quote not a worthy goal onto itself. 77% of voters disagree with them and that includes large majorities of republicans, independents and democrats. what is your take on this? >> again i don't want to be a downer here, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23%
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)